Arcadia: A Pastoral Tale

Arcadia: A Pastoral Tale is my newest game. It was created with Twine, which means that it’s a very simple text-based game.

When playing, please keep in mind that this game is not a race. It is a stroll, an afternoon walk. There’s no challenge, no puzzles, no wrong choices. There’s just the path that you take and the things that you see.

7 Comments

  1. James Patton

    Ooh! A new game! Looking forward to playing this.

    “this game is not a race. It is a stroll, an afternoon walk. There is no challenge, no puzzles, no wrong choices. There’s just the path that you take and the things that you see.”

    Sounds like it’s absolutely my cup of tea.

  2. @gnome: Glad to be useful! 🙂

    @AlexP: Thanks! And that’s a pretty good description of the game. (Caution: spoiler.) Different paths do provide different insights, but there’s a strong focus on the aesthetic, on how you experience the walk home.

    @James: Hope you like it!

  3. James Patton

    I really enjoyed that. No challenge, no distracting calculations or estimates about how to beat an enemy – just a beautiful stroll. It *was* my cup of tea!

    What I like about it most is that it’s supremely relaxing and the choices draw you into the world, but there’s no anxiety about what you’re missing. With some of these games you can get really concerned about the things you’re *not* seeing because you didn’t pick them. With this, each choice yields a wonderful reward in the form of immersive prose, so I didn’t get that at all. While you do miss information by taking certain paths, you also gain a lot either way, so it feels like the game is working with you rather than against you.

    Also, I totally get the Lycidas reference.

  4. Pingback: Freeware Game Pick - Arcadia: A Pastoral Tale | DIYGamer

  5. I really enjoyed that. For a while I thought the idyllic pastoral thing was going to go overboard, but like in your games you manage to keep the romanticism from dissolving into air-headedness, but also without making the heavy elements feel like they were just tacked on for cheap gravitas. What I mean is, that the dark elements of the story and the whimsical, or sentimental or (just pretend I’ve hit on the right word in this general direction, I know those two were both wrong) elements seem to belong together, which is an impressive thing.

    And I need to make dinner know, so I imagine I wrote a better thought out comment.

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