Parallel Lines: Echoes/Awakening

Two short films made for the Philips Cinema Parallel Lines competition. They were made under adverse technical circumstances and with little time, but I think they turned out quite well.

The first one is a question.

The second one is an answer, but not necessarily to the same question.

There are connections.

Please watch them, like them, and share them with your friends, family, colleagues, and perfect strangers. Every bit of support means we’re a tiny bit closer to being able to tell more stories – if you enjoyed one or both of the films, we’d really appreciate it if you took a few minutes to vote for them on YouTube or to share them on Facebook or Twitter. Thanks!

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4 Comments

  1. I should probably watch these again when I don’t have a splitting headache, but initial impressions:

    1. Fuck fancy equipment. The atmosphere from that camerawork and soundtrack worked great.

    2. That said, I don’t know if it was the recording, or the editing, or if it’s just me, but the voices didn’t seem to fit into either video. The dialogue was jarring for me, and felt like it was either added as an afterthought, or there was something technically wrong with how it was done. My first thought after watching it was that I’d liked to have seen a version of this without speech, or even with the lines flashed to (graffitied on a wall somewhere, or something), since I think that would have flowed better. (This may be a very subjective judgement though, since I often prefer short films without dialogue).

    3. Only in beachless Northern Europe will anyone be able to suspend disbelief after seeing that shell, and hearing the word “unicorn.” (Waves tiny Australian flag, throws sand in your eyes, and runs away before you can tell him that no one likes a pedant, especially if that pedant is him).

  2. 2. That said, I don’t know if it was the recording, or the editing, or if it’s just me, but the voices didn’t seem to fit into either video. The dialogue was jarring for me, and felt like it was either added as an afterthought, or there was something technically wrong with how it was done. My first thought after watching it was that I’d liked to have seen a version of this without speech, or even with the lines flashed to (graffitied on a wall somewhere, or something), since I think that would have flowed better. (This may be a very subjective judgement though, since I often prefer short films without dialogue).

    Part of it is a technical issue (we need a good microphone, but can’t afford it); another part of it – and I don’t mean to sound arrogant here, just trying to analyze – is the force of the visuals and the music, against which the dialogue doesn’t stand much of a chance. Still, I’m not bothered by it, so I can’t say much.

    Only in beachless Northern Europe will anyone be able to suspend disbelief after seeing that shell, and hearing the word “unicorn.” (Waves tiny Australian flag, throws sand in your eyes, and runs away before you can tell him that no one likes a pedant, especially if that pedant is him).

    Hey, we shot that in Greece, where we have plenty of beaches. And the term unicorn is supposed to indicate that it’s something entirely mystical, some kind of leftover from a time when the world was not yet the apocalyptic mess it is in the film (thus the title, “Echoes”).

  3. Part of me really wishes we’d done Awakening in a fictional language (“Quai es daian?” “Es ain monokeron.”), but I was afraid we might end up getting disqualified over it.

  4. angry with very little reason

     /  November 10, 2010